April 16, 2014

Poll Watch: McClatchy-Marist 2016 National Presidential Survey

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 51% [52%] {56%} [53%]
  • Paul Ryan (R) 43% [44%] {40%} [37%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 53% [58%] (50%) {48%} [47%] (46%)
  • Chris Christie (R) 42% [37%] (37%) {45%} [41%] (43%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 53% [55%]
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 40% [41%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 54% [58%] {55%} [50%] (52%)
  • Rand Paul (R) 40% [38%] {40%} [38%] (41%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 54% [56%] {57%}
  • Ted Cruz (R) 39% [39%] {35%}
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 54% [58%] {52%} [50%] (52%)
  • Marco Rubio (R) 38% [37%] {42%} [38%] (40%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 55% [58%] {53%} [48%] (54%)
  • Jeb Bush (R) 39% [38%] {41%} [40%] (38%)

National survey of 1,036 registered voters was conducted April 7-10, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 3.0 percentage points. Results from the poll conducted February 4-9, 2014 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted January 12-14, 2014 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted December 3-5, 2013 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted July 15-18, 2013 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted March 25-27, 2013 are in parentheses.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 10:00 am. Filed under 2016, Hillary Clinton, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: McClatchy-Marist 2016 Republican Nomination Survey

McClatchy-Marist 2016 GOP Nomination Poll 

  • Mike Huckabee 13% (13%)
  • Jeb Bush 13% (8%) {8%} [10%] (10%)
  • Chris Christie 12% (13%) {16%} [18%] (15%)
  • Rand Paul 12% (9%) {9%} [12%] (9%)
  • Paul Ryan 12% (9%) {12%} [11%] (13%)
  • Marco Rubio 7% (12%) {7%} [7%] (12%)
  • Scott Walker 5% (7%) {4%} [4%] (2%)
  • Ted Cruz 4% (5%) {5%} [10%] (7%)
  • Bobby Jindal 4% {3%} (1%)
  • Rick Santorum 3% (2%) {5%} [4%] (2%)
  • Rick Perry 3% (2%) {6%} [3%] (4%)
  • John Kasich 0% (1%)
  • Undecided 14% (12%) {25%} [13%] (25%)

Survey of 416 registered Republicans and GOP-leaning Independents was conducted April 7-10, 2014The margin of error is +/- 4.8 percentage points.  Results from the poll conducted February 4-9, 2014 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted January 12-14, 2014 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted December 3-5, 2013 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted July 15-18, 2013 are in parentheses.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 8:00 am. Filed under 2016, Mike Huckabee, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Mitchell Research Michigan 2014 Senatorial Survey

Mitchell Research Michigan 2014 Senate Poll

  • Terri Lynn Land (R) 44% (32%)
  • Gary Peters (D) 38% (33%)
  • Undecided 18% (35%)

Survey of 1,460 likely voters was conducted April 9, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 2.56 percentage points.  Party ID: 38% (41%) Democrat; 36% (37%) Republican; 19% (17%) Independent; 7% (5%) Another party. Results from the poll conducted March 19-21, 2013 are in parentheses.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 4:00 am. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

April 15, 2014

Poll Watch: Loras College Iowa 2016 Republican Caucus Survey

Loras College Iowa 2016 GOP Caucus Poll 

  • Mike Huckabee 14.7%
  • Jeb Bush 10.7%
  • Rand Paul 8.5%
  • Paul Ryan 8.3%
  • Chris Christie 8.0%
  • Ted Cruz 6.2%
  • Marco Rubio 4.7%
  • Rick Santorum 4.7%
  • Scott Walker 4.7%
  • Rick Perry 3.0%
  • John Kasich 0.7%
  • Other 0.7%
  • Undecided 23.8%

Survey of 600 likely Iowa GOP primary voters was conducted April 7-8, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 4 percentage points.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 6:22 pm. Filed under 2016, Iowa Caucuses, Mike Huckabee, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: PPP (D) Texas 2014 Gubernatorial Survey

PPP (D) Texas 2014 Gubernatorial Poll

  • Greg Abbott (R) 51% [50%] (48%) {46%}
  • Wendy Davis (D) 37% [35%] (40%) {34%}
  • Not sure 13% [15%] (12%) {20%} 

Among Men

  • Greg Abbott (R) 53% [57%] (50%) {52%}
  • Wendy Davis (D) 32%  [34%] (37%) {30%}
  • Not sure 15% [10%] (13%) {18%}

Among Women 

  • Greg Abbott (R) 49% [43%] (47%) {42%}
  • Wendy Davis (D) 41%  [37%] (42%) {37%}
  • Not sure 11% [20%] (11%) {21%}

Favorable / Unfavorable {Net}

  • Greg Abbott 40% [35%] (32%) {33%} / 27% [32%] (26%) {24%} {+13%}
  • Wendy Davis 33% [36%] (39%) {15%} / 47% [42%] (29%) {19%} {-14%}

Survey of 559 registered voters was conducted April 10-13, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 4.1 percentage points. Party ID: 44% [42%] (38%) {43%} Republican; 32% [35%] (34%) {32%} Democrat; 24% [24%] (28%) {25%} Independent/Other.  Ideology: 29% [26%] (21%) {22%} Somewhat conservative; 23% [25%] (28%) {25%} Very conservative; 23% [26%] (26%) {30%} Moderate; 17% [14%] (16%) {15%} Somewhat liberal; 8% [8%] (10%) {8%} Very liberal.  Results from the poll conducted November 1-4, 2013 are in square brackets.Results from the poll conducted June 28 – July 1, 2013 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted January 24-27, 2013 are in curly brackets.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 2:21 pm. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

Yes, Mitt Romney Was Right About Vladimir Putin

Writing at the National Interest, Robert O’Brien joins a chorus of conservative commentators happily reminding the world that Mitt Romney was right to tag Vladimir Putin’s Russia as America’s top geopolitical foe, even going so far as to compare Romney to Winston Churchill. This has elicited eye-rolling from Daniel Larison, who in 2012 dismissed Romney’s criticisms of Putin’s Russia as “bizarre” and “outdated”:

Romney assumed that Russia was an inveterate foe of the U.S. on everything because Russia sometimes opposed U.S. policies. This took an unremarkable observation–Russia strongly disagrees with the U.S. on a few high-profile issues–and turned it into an absurd, discrediting exaggeration. He seemed to think that any kind of diplomatic engagement or accommodation with Russia on any issue was equivalent to appeasement. It didn’t matter that he couldn’t ever explain how the U.S. had “appeased” Russia (or any other government)–he was just reciting from an ideological script that he picked up from other people in his party.

In light of this year’s events, it is perplexing that anyone could any longer reduce the moral and diplomatic chasm between the United States and Russia to “disagreement on a few high-profile issues” — as if the clash between the two nations is nothing more than a petty ideological shouting match.

One may question the wisdom of Romney’s particular policy prescriptions — and it is no great surprise that the leader of a national political party would “recite from an ideological script” — but the question at hand is not about Romney per se, but about President Obama’s blindness toward Vladimir Putin’s imperial ambitions. In the campaign against Romney, Obama mocked him for being stuck in a “Cold War mentality.” But the so-called “Cold War mentality” is little more than a recognition of the stubbornly persistent primacy of power politics in foreign policy.

As Robert Kagan has cogently written, liberal internationalists have long dreamed of a Kantian world of ‘perpetual peace’ in which reason, diplomacy, and economic incentives will finally replace the need for projections of power — but this is a seductive illusion. The self-congratulating American narrative is that, as a threat to the prevailing liberal order, authoritarianism was vanquished at the end of the Cold War. To acknowledge that Russia is once again a geopolitical threat would be to admit that the ‘End of History’ has not arrived after all — and a war-weary public, tired of the burdens of global leadership, is loath to confront yet another imperialist autocrat who provides moral and material support to the world’s bloodiest dictators, seizes foreign territory, criminalizes dissent, and makes a fool of our president on the world stage. But this year’s events have decisively proven that Vladimir Putin intends to reassert Russia as a great power — and that his vision for the world is unquestionably hostile to American interests — and to the moral vision of classical liberalism.

At the bottom of Larison’s ambivalence toward Vladimir Putin is a sort of benign neglect; a lazy moral relativism that, while well-intended, cannot reliably distinguish between good and evil, seeing in Obama and Putin just two sides of the same belligerent coin. But the distance between the United States and Russia is not simply a “disagreement” over “a few issues” — it is a fundamental conflict of visions about the world order. In 2012, Larison approvingly quoted Heather Hurlbert, who argues that the ‘Cold War mentality’ is a sort of psychological need to rely on the “comfortable certainties” of the 1980s. But it is those who would ignore or dismiss Vladimir Putin who are retreating into the mirage of certainty; the implicit assumption that the existing geopolitical order will persist for all time if we would only leave well enough alone. But America’s enemies will never accept the unipolar order — it must be constantly, vigorously defended. If we choose to shirk from our responsibility to uphold the world order, others will step in and remake it in their own image. Vladimir Putin is taking the long view in his pursuit of power. America must do the same.

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by @ 7:30 am. Filed under Barack Obama, Foreign Affairs, Mitt Romney, Opinion

April 14, 2014

Poll Watch: Rasmussen Generic Congressional Ballot Survey

Rasmussen Generic Congressional Ballot Survey

  • Democrats 40% 40% 39% 41% 38% 39% 39% 41% 41% 40% 39% 42% 41% 41% 40% 40% (39%) 40% (38%) (38%) (41%) (39%) (41%) (43%) (43%) (43%) (45%) (42%) (40%)
  • Republicans 38% 39% 38% 37% 39% 39% 36% 37% 37% 38% 40% 37% 35% 37%  38% 40% (42%) 40% (43%) (43%) (40%) (40%) (39%) (37%) (37%) (36%) (38%) (38%) (37%)

The national telephone survey of 3,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from April 7 -April 13, 2014. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

by @ 4:03 pm. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Rasmussen Illinois 2014 Gubernatorial Survey

Rasmussen Illinois 2014 Gubernatorial Poll

  • Bruce Rauner (R) 43%
  • Pat Quinn (D) 40%
  • Some other candidate 6%
  • Undecided 10% 

Survey of 750 likely voters was conducted April 9-10, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 4 percentage points.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 11:32 am. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Survey

Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Poll 

How would you rate the job Barack Obama has been doing as president?

  • Strongly approve 25%
  • Somewhat approve 22%
  • Somewhat disapprove 12%
  • Strongly disapprove 40%

President Obama Job Approval

  • Approve 47%
  • Disapprove 52%

Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. To reach those who have abandoned traditional landline telephones, Rasmussen Reports uses an online survey tool to interview randomly selected participants from a demographically diverse panel. The margin of sampling error for the full sample of 1,500 Likely Voters is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

by @ 9:51 am. Filed under 2014, Barack Obama, Poll Watch

April 13, 2014

Poll Watch: Magellan Strategies (R) Montana 2014 Senatorial Survey

Magellan Strategies (R) Montana 2014 Senate Poll

  • Steve Daines (R) 49%
  • John Walsh (D) 36%
  • Roger Roots (L) 4%
  • Some other candidate 5%
  • Undecided 6%

Favorable / Unfavorable {Net}

  • Steve Daines 53% / 33% {+20%}
  • John Walsh 47% / 29% {+18%}

Survey of 2,490 likely voters was conducted April 1-2, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 1.96 percentage points. Party ID: 35% Republican; 27% Democrat; 38% Something else.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 11:31 am. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Survey

Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Poll 

How would you rate the job Barack Obama has been doing as president?

  • Strongly approve 24%
  • Somewhat approve 23%
  • Somewhat disapprove 12%
  • Strongly disapprove 40%

President Obama Job Approval

  • Approve 47%
  • Disapprove 52%

Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. To reach those who have abandoned traditional landline telephones, Rasmussen Reports uses an online survey tool to interview randomly selected participants from a demographically diverse panel. The margin of sampling error for the full sample of 1,500 Likely Voters is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

by @ 11:30 am. Filed under 2014, Barack Obama, Poll Watch

April 12, 2014

Poll Watch: Marketing Resource Group (R) Michigan 2016 Presidential Survey

MRG (R) Michigan 2016 Presidential Poll

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 44%
  • Chris Christie (R) 38%
  • Unsure 18%

Survey of 600 likely voters was conducted March 24-28, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 4.1 percentage points. Party ID: 31% Democrat; 28% Republican; 36.5% Independent; 3% Other.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 12:04 pm. Filed under 2016, Hillary Clinton, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Survey

Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Poll 

How would you rate the job Barack Obama has been doing as president?

  • Strongly approve 24%
  • Somewhat approve 25%
  • Somewhat disapprove 11%
  • Strongly disapprove 39%

President Obama Job Approval

  • Approve 49%
  • Disapprove 50%

Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. To reach those who have abandoned traditional landline telephones, Rasmussen Reports uses an online survey tool to interview randomly selected participants from a demographically diverse panel. The margin of sampling error for the full sample of 1,500 Likely Voters is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

by @ 12:00 pm. Filed under 2014, Barack Obama, Poll Watch

April 11, 2014

Poll Watch: Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Survey

Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Poll 

How would you rate the job Barack Obama has been doing as president?

  • Strongly approve 26%
  • Somewhat approve 24%
  • Somewhat disapprove 11%
  • Strongly disapprove 38%

President Obama Job Approval

  • Approve 50%
  • Disapprove 49%

Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. To reach those who have abandoned traditional landline telephones, Rasmussen Reports uses an online survey tool to interview randomly selected participants from a demographically diverse panel. The margin of sampling error for the full sample of 1,500 Likely Voters is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

by @ 8:00 pm. Filed under 2014, Barack Obama, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Rasmussen Illinois 2014 Senatorial Survey

  • Dick Durbin (D) 51%
  • Jim Oberweis (R) 37%
  • Some other candidate 3%
  • Undecided 10%

Survey of 750 likely voters was conducted April 9-10, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 4 percentage points.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 11:51 am. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Rutgers-Eagleton New Jersey Survey on Governor Chris Christie

Rutgers-Eagleton New Jersey Poll on Gov. Chris Christie

Do you approve or disapprove of the way Chris Christie is handling his job as governor? 

  • Approve 55% {55%} [53%] (68%) {67%} [66%] (70%) {68%} [73%] (67%)
  • Disapprove 41% {39%} [41%] (26%) {29%} [31%] (25%) {26%} [23%] (26%)

Among Democrats

  • Approve 29% {34%} [29%] (51%) {46%} [50%] (56%) {51%} [62%] (49%)
  • Disapprove 67% {60%} [64%] (41%) {47%} [45%] (39%) {42%} [31%] (39%)

Among Republicans

  • Approve 86% {83%} [83%] (93%) {91%} [89%] (87%) {93%} [90%] (88%)
  • Disapprove 10% {12%} [13%] (6%) {8%} [10%] (9%) {5%} [10%] (8%)

Among Independents

  • Approve 62% {58%} [60%] (71%) {74%} [70%] (77%) {75%} [75%] (76%)
  • Disapprove 34% {36%} [33%] (24%) {21%} [26%] (18%) {20%} [21%] (20%)

Among Moderates 

  • Approve 57% [53%] (71%) {65%} [69%] (73%) {70%} [75%] (68%)
  • Disapprove 39% [40%] (23%) {30%} [27%] (22%) {25%} [20%] (25%)

Please tell me if your general impression of Governor Chris Christie is favorable or unfavorable.

  • Favorable 50% {49%} [46%] (65%) {61%} [60%] (64%) {64%} [70%] (67%) {48%} [49%] (50%) {46%} [47%] (49%) {49%} [45%] (44%) {46%} [45%] (46%) {46%} [45%]
  • Unfavorable 42% {40%} [43%] (27%) {28%} [32%] (26%) {26%} [20%] (25%) {42%} [40%] (39%) {42%} [42%] (37%) {39%} [47%] (42%) {44%} [38%] (42%) {39%} [26%]

Among Democrats

  • Favorable 25% {28%} [19%] (45%) {38%} [43%] (48%) {45%} [59%] (49%) {22%} [25%] (27%) {28%} [22%] {26%} [20%] (18%) {24%}
  • Unfavorable 63% {60%} [69%] (47%) {49%} [47%] (41%) {41%} [29%] (38%) {68%} [62%] (62%) {61%} [63%] {63%} [72%] (65%) {67%}

Among Republicans

  • Favorable 82% {81%} [78%] (92%) {90%} [87%] (86%) {90%} [88%] (90%) {88%} [84%] (79%) {85%} [81%] {87%} [82%] (79%) {76%}
  • Unfavorable 13% {12%} [15%] (5%) {6%} [10%] (12%) {6%} [5%] (8%) {8%} [9%] (12%) {8%} [14%] {10%} [11%] (16%) {19%}

Among Independents

  • Favorable 55% {49%} [55%] (69%) {68%} [64%] (69%) {71%} [71%] (73%) {49%} [48%] (55%) {43%} [52%] {52%} [47%] (49%) {50%}
  • Unfavorable 37% {38%} [33%] (22%) {20%} [26%] (16%) {19%} [20%] (19%) {36%} [40%] (32%) {42%} [37%] {33%} [45%] (35%) {37%}

Survey of 731 registered voters was conducted March 31 – April 6, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 3.6 percentage points.  Party ID: 36% {36%} [39%] (36%) {39%} [40%] (41%) {41%} [39%] (43%) {38%} [35%] (37%) {39%} [37%] {35%} [31%] (36%) {35%} Democrat; 21% {23%} [19%] (21%) {21%} [21%] (22%) {19%} [22%] (22%) {24%} [24%] (22%) {21%} [20%] {18%} [19%] (22%) {23%} Republican; 43% {41%} [42%] (42%) {40%} [38%] (37%) {40%} [40%] (35%) {38%} [41%] (41%) {40%} [43%] {47%} [50%] (42%) {42%} Independent.  Results from the poll conducted February 22-28, 2014 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted January 14-19, 2014 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted October 28 – November 2, 2013 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted October 7-13, 2013 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted September 3-9, 2013 are in square brackets. Results from the poll conducted June 3-9, 2013 are in parentheses.Results from the poll conducted April 3-7, 2013 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted January 30 – February 3, 2013 are in square brackets. Results from the poll conducted November 14-17, 2012 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted September 27-30, 2012 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted August 23-25, 2012 are in square brackets. Results from the poll conducted May 31 – June 4, 2012 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted March 21-27, 2012 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted February 9-11, 2012 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted November 9-12, 2011 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted October 6-9, 2011 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted August 9-15, 2011 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted March 28 – April 4, 2011 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted February 24-26, 2011 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted October, 2010 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted September, 2010 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted August, 2010 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted February, 2010 are in square brackets.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 9:35 am. Filed under 2016, Chris Christie, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: PPP (D) North Carolina 2016 Presidential Survey

PPP (D) North Carolina 2016 Presidential Poll

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 45% {47%} [47%] (46%) {46%} [47%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 44% {46%} [43%] (44%) {45%} [43%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 46% {46%} [45%] (42%) {42%} [43%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 44% {42%} [42%] (43%) {45%} [46%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 47% {49%} [47%] (47%) {48%} [50%] (52%) 
  • Rand Paul (R) 43% {43%} [44%] (43%) {44%} [41%] (40%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 48% {49%} [48%]
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 43% {42%} [43%]

Among Independents

  • Jeb Bush (R) 45% {38%} [35%] (41%) {44%} [41%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 39% {46%} [50%] (36%) {37%} [40%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 45% {38%} [33%] (39%) {50%} [46%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 38% {39%} [47%] (33%) {31%} [31%]
  • Rand Paul (R) 44% {40%} [39%] (46%) {48%} [45%] (42%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 35% {48%} [49%] (34%) {42%} [42%] (48%)
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 44% {34%} [36%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 38% {48%} [52%]

Among Moderates

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 60% [58%] (58%) {59%} [61%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 29% [25%] (25%) {30%} [26%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 60% [54%] (50%) {51%} [54%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 31% [31%] (32%) {32%} [36%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 59% [58%] (60%) {62%} [63%] (65%)
  • Rand Paul (R) 26% [29%] (25%) {25%} [26%] (25%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 62% [60%]
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 28% [25%]

Among Men

  • Jeb Bush (R) 50% {49%} [46%] (49%) {51%} [46%] 
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 42% {42%} [45%] (41%) {38%} [42%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 47% {48%} [46%] (49%) {51%} [51%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 42% {40%} [41%] (37%) {35%} [37%]
  • Rand Paul (R) 48% {49%} [47%] (49%) {49%} [46%] (47%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 45% {43%} [45%] (44%) {43%} [46%] (46%)
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 47% {44%} [46%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 45% {47%} [47%]

Among Women

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 49% {50%} [49%] (51%) {53%} [52%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 39% {43%} [41%] (38%) {39%} [40%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 49% {52%} [48%] (47%) {49%} [47%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 42% {37%} [38%] (38%) {40%} [42%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 49% {55%} [49%] (49%) {53%} [54%] (57%)
  • Rand Paul (R) 39% {38%} [41%] (38%) {38%} [38%] (35%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 50% {52%} [50%]
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 40% {41%} [41%]

Among Whites

  • Jeb Bush (R) 55% {57%} [54%] (55%) {58%} [53%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 37% {35%} [37%] (34%) {35%} [37%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 54% {51%} [50%] (53%) {57%} [56%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 37% {36%} [36%] (32%) {30%} [33%]
  • Rand Paul (R) 54% {54%} [54%] (56%) {54%} [51%] (51%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 38% {38%} [36%] (35%) {37%} [39%] (41%)
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 53% {53%} [54%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 38% {37%} [38%]

Among Blacks

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 77% {86%} [82%] (86%) {81%} [81%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 8% {9%} [7%] (7%) {9%} [13%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 78% {80%} [78%] (79%) {81%} [77%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 13% {14%} [11%] (11%) {9%} [17%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 80% {87%} [82%] (84%) {83%} [86%] (87%)
  • Rand Paul (R) 10% {11%} [10%] (5%) {12%} [11%] (8%)
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 80% {89%} [82%]
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 10% {9%} [9%]

Survey of 740 North Carolina voters was conducted April 3-6, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 3.6 percentage points. Party ID: 42% {42%} [39%] (43%) {43%} [45%] (43%) Democrat; 36% {35%} [34%] (33%) {34%} [33%] (34%) Republican; 22% {23%} [27%] (23%) {23%} [21%] (24%) Independent/Other.  Gender: 53% {53%} [53%] (53%) {53%} [54%] (57%) Women; 47% {47%} [47%] (47%) {47%} [46%] (43%) Men. Race: 74% {74%} [75%] (73%) {73%} [73%] (72%) White; 20% {20%} [20%] (21%) {21%} [20%] (22%) Black; 6% {6%} [5%] (6%) {6%} [6%] (6%) Other.  Results from the poll conducted March 6-9, 2014 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted February 6-9, 2014 are in square brackets. Results from the poll conducted January 9-12, 2014 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted December 5-8, 2013 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted November 8-11, 2013 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted April 11-14, 2013 are in parentheses.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 4:00 am. Filed under 2016, Poll Watch

April 10, 2014

Global Lies and “Global Warming”

NEW YORK — Marc Morano of the Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow (CFACT) wrote recently about two scientists in Singapore and Hong Kong who advocate exaggeration and “information manipulation” to boost public support for international agreements to fight so-called “global warming.”

The perpetrators of this fraud are Fuhai Hong, an assistant professor in the Division of Economics at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University, and Xiaojian Zhao, an assistant professor of economics at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. In nothing less than a peer-reviewed publication called The American Journal of Agricultural Economics, these professors of deceit write:

It appears that news media and some pro-environmental organizations have the tendency to accentuate or even exaggerate the damage caused by climate change. This article provides a rationale for this tendency by using a modified International Environmental Agreement (IEA) model with asymmetric information. We find that the information manipulation has an instrumental value, as it ex post induces more countries to participate in an IEA, which will eventually enhance global welfare.

They conclude that “the aforementioned exaggeration of climate damage may alleviate the problem of insufficient IEA participation.”

For years, skeptics of warmist alarmism have sensed that advocates of the “global-warming” theory metaphorically heated up their thermometers to promote a collectivist agenda that would bolster big government as the ultimate weapon against this phantom “threat.”

This paper proves this disturbing state of affairs. CFACT reader Bob Armstrong today coined an excellent phrase for this phenomenon: “Crimes against reality.”

Whatever one thinks of so-called “global warming,” everyone should agree that it should be discussed, debated, and decided upon based on actual facts. Instead, these two university professors have published a paper that applauds lying about science as a strategy to achieve political ends.

The words of these scientists are outrageous. That an American peer-reviewed journal would give them a platform to advocate deliberate lies about science is scandalous and staggering.

“The authors not only believe that their dubious ends justify their shady means,” said CFACT’s Craig Rucker. “They institutionalize ‘information manipulation’ as a tactic, host panels about it at climate conferences, and publish it in journals. They’re shameless.”

A true cynic might imagine that these professors hope to encourage America and the West to tie each other in regulatory knots while the mighty People’s Republic of China and the East burn coal and pump CO2 into the atmosphere as a sort of mood music to accompany dynamic economic growth.

Whatever their motives, professors Fuhai and Xiaojian should be deeply embarrassed of themselves, as should be the editors of The American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

__________________________________________________________________________

-Deroy Murdock is a Manhattan-based Fox News Contributor and a media fellow with the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University.

by @ 8:00 pm. Filed under Deroy Murdock, Opinion

Poll Watch: UNH/WMUR New Hampshire 2014 Senatorial Survey

UNH/WMUR New Hampshire 2014 Senate Poll

  • Jeanne Shaheen (D) 45% (47%) 
  • Scott Brown (R) 39% (37%)
  • Other 2% (3%)
  • Don’t know/Undecided 14% (14%)

Survey of 387 likely voters was conducted April 1-9, 2014.  Results from the poll conducted January 21-26, 2014 are in parentheses.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 6:07 pm. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: PPP (D) North Carolina 2016 Republican Primary Survey

PPP (D) North Carolina 2016 GOP Primary Poll

  • Mike Huckabee 22% {19%} [20%] (15%)
  • Jeb Bush 18% {12%} [15%] (14%) {15%} [16%] (9%)
  • Chris Christie 12% {15%} [11%] (17%) {19%} [20%] (10%)
  • Ted Cruz 12% {14%} [8%] (11%) {12%} [12%]
  • Paul Ryan 9% {4%} [8%] (11%) {7%} [7%] (12%)
  • Rand Paul 9% {12%} [14%] (14%) {13%} [12%] (6%)
  • Scott Walker 7% {6%} [4%] (3%) {5%} [1%]
  • Marco Rubio 5% {5%} [7%] (9%) {10%} [10%] (21%)
  • Bobby Jindal 2% {1%} [3%] (5%) {3%} [6%]
  • Someone else/Not sure 6% {12%} [9%] (13%) {11%} [13%] (8%)

Among Men

  • Mike Huckabee 19% {15%} [15%] (14%)
  • Ted Cruz 16% {16%} [7%] (14%) {15%} [16%]
  • Jeb Bush 15% {13%} [18%] (14%) {14%} [14%] (11%)
  • Chris Christie 12% {16%} [14%] (18%) {18%} [19%] (10%)
  • Scott Walker 10% {7%} [6%] (4%) {6%} [1%]
  • Paul Ryan 8% {3%} [5%] (10%) {5%} [6%] (12%)
  • Rand Paul 8% {13%} [19%] (14%) {15%} [16%] (9%)
  • Marco Rubio 6% {3%} [7%] (7%) {10%} [9%] (22%)
  • Bobby Jindal 1% {2%} [3%] (6%) {3%} [5%]
  • Someone else/Not sure 4% {12%} [6%] (9%) {7%} [10%] (7%)

Among Women

  • Mike Huckabee 24% {24%} [25%] (16%)
  • Jeb Bush 21% {11%} [13%] (13%) {16%} [18%] (8%)
  • Chris Christie 12% {13%} [7%] (17%) {19%} [20%] (10%)
  • Rand Paul 11% {10%} [9%] (14%) {11%} [8%] (4%)
  • Paul Ryan 9% {5%} [12%] (11%) {8%} [9%] (12%)
  • Ted Cruz 7% {11%} [9%] (9%) {10%} [9%]
  • Marco Rubio 5% {7%} [7%] (11%) {10%} [10%] (19%)
  • Scott Walker 3% {5%} [2%] (1%) {4%} [0%]
  • Bobby Jindal 2% {1%} [3%] (4%) {3%} [7%]
  • Someone else/Not sure 7% {14%} [13%] (17%) {15%} [17%] (10%)

Survey of 314 Republican primary voters was conducted April 3-6, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 5.5 percentage points. Political ideology: 39% {37%} [35%] (38%) {37%} [36%] (44%) Very conservative; 32% {35%} [33%] (40%) {39%} [36%] (35%) Somewhat conservative; 21% {20%} [22%] (16%) {16%} [21%] (13%) Moderate; 6% {4%} [7%] (4%) {7%} [4%] (6%) Somewhat liberal; 3% {3%} [3%] (2%) {1%} [3%] (1%) Very liberal.  Results from the poll conducted March 6-9, 2014 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted February 6-9, 2014 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted January 9-12, 2014 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted December 5-8, 2013 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted November 8-11, 2013 are in square brackets. Results from the poll conducted December 6-9, 2012 are in parentheses.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 3:24 pm. Filed under 2016, Mike Huckabee, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Survey

Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Poll 

How would you rate the job Barack Obama has been doing as president?

  • Strongly approve 27%
  • Somewhat approve 23%
  • Somewhat disapprove 11%
  • Strongly disapprove 38%

President Obama Job Approval

  • Approve 50%
  • Disapprove 49%

Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. To reach those who have abandoned traditional landline telephones, Rasmussen Reports uses an online survey tool to interview randomly selected participants from a demographically diverse panel. The margin of sampling error for the full sample of 1,500 Likely Voters is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

by @ 1:21 pm. Filed under 2014, Barack Obama, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: PPP (D) Michigan 2016 Presidential Survey

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 46% {43%} [44%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 37% {40%} [38%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 48% {48%} [55%]
  • Rand Paul (R) 39% {39%} [35%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 49% {46%} [51%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 38% {42%} [37%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 50%
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 38%
Among Independents

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 39% {29%} [28%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 34% {42%} [43%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 43% {36%} [43%]
  • Rand Paul (R) 37% {45%} [43%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 41% {34%} [39%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 32% {45%} [40%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 45%
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 34%

Among Moderates 

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 50% {47%} [52%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 31% {32%} [29%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 57% {61%} [71%]
  • Rand Paul (R) 24% {23%} [20%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 55% {59%} [59%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 28% {29%} [28%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 56%
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 27%

Among Men

  • Chris Christie (R) 41% {48%} [43%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 40% {34%} [40%]
  • Rand Paul (R) 48% {49%} [42%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 42% {38%} [49%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 42% {52%} [43%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 42% {35%} [45%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 46%
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 42%

Among Women 

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 52% {50%} [49%]
  • Chris Christie (R) 32% {32%} [34%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 54% {56%} [62%]
  • Rand Paul (R) 31% {31%} [27%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 55% {56%} [57%]
  • Jeb Bush (R) 35% {34%} [31%]
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 53%
  • Mike Huckabee (R) 34%

Survey of 825 registered voters was conducted April 3-6, 2014.  The margin of error is +/- 3.4 percentage points. Party ID: 35% {35%}[36%] Democrat; 30% {30%} [29%] Republican; 35% {35%} [35%] Independent/Other.  Political ideology: 28% {31%} [33%] Moderate; 26% {25%} [25%] Somewhat conservative; 19% {17%} [18%]Somewhat liberal; 14% {14%} [13%] Very conservative; 12% {12%}[11%] Very liberal. Results from the poll conducted December 5-8, 2013 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted May 30 – June 2, 2013 are in square brackets.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 10:19 am. Filed under 2016, Hillary Clinton, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Suffolk University Iowa 2016 Democratic Caucus Survey

Suffolk University Iowa 2016 Democratic Caucus Poll 

  • Hillary Clinton 62.96%
  • Elizabeth Warren 11.85%
  • Joe Biden 9.63%
  • Mark Warner 1.48%
  • Andrew Cuomo 0.74%
  • Deval Patrick 0.74%
  • Cory Booker 0.00%
  • Undecided 11.85%

Survey of 135 Democratic caucus-goers was conducted April 3-8, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 8.4 percentage points.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 4:00 am. Filed under 2016, Iowa Caucuses, Poll Watch

April 9, 2014

Gay Left’s New Pin-Up: Senator Joe McCarthy

NEW YORK — “Are you now or have you ever been a supporter of traditional marriage?”

This question, as if snarled from the grave of Senator Joe McCarthy (R – Wisconsin), is what the intolerant gay-Left now selectively demands of people who defined marriage — even six years ago — as the union of one man and one woman.

The gay Left seems to be building a 1950s-style blacklist. It now bears the name of Brendan Eich, the freshly resigned CEO of Mozilla and one of the technical pioneers who settled the Internet. Mozilla runs the Firefox web browser, and Eich developed JavaScript, the computer-programming language that channels rivers of 0s and 1s into shopping, music, and opinion websites. (And that’s just the clean stuff.)

As the Los Angeles Times reported, seemingly in early 2009, Eich gave $1,000 to the campaign for California’s Proposition 8, a statewide ballot initiative to ban gay marriage. The referendum passed 52 percent to 48 in November 2008. Eich’s check sat quietly in the background until he became Mozilla’s CEO on March 24.

On March 26, just two days later, Eich’s Prop. 8 donation began to stir discussion. That day, he issued a statement on his personal website titled “Inclusiveness at Mozilla.” He reached out to the gay community and offered his support:

I know there are concerns about my commitment to fostering equality and welcome for LGBT individuals at Mozilla. I hope to lay those concerns to rest…
A number of Mozillians, including LGBT individuals and allies, have stepped forward to offer guidance and assistance in this. I cannot thank you enough, and I ask for your ongoing help to make Mozilla a place of equality and welcome for all. Here are my commitments, and here’s what you can expect:

• Active commitment to equality in everything we do, from employment to events to community-building.

• Working with LGBT communities and allies, to listen and learn what does and doesn’t make Mozilla supportive and welcoming.

• My ongoing commitment to our Community Participation Guidelines, our inclusive health benefits, our anti-discrimination policies, and the spirit that underlies all of these…

I know some will be skeptical about this, and that words alone will not change anything. I can only ask for your support to have the time to “show, not tell”; and in the meantime express my sorrow at having caused pain…

I am committed to ensuring that Mozilla is, and will remain, a place that includes and supports everyone, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, age, race, ethnicity, economic status, or religion.

Eich’s words were not good enough.

The very next day, Mozilla employees began demanding Eich’s resignation. Chris McAvoy (not to be confused with NRO’s own Chris McEvoy), leader of Mozilla’s Open Badges Project, was one of Eich’s most prominent critics. McAvoy seemed blissfully unaware of this bitter irony: He demanded that Eich quit his job because of his beliefs, even as McAvoy praised Mozilla as a place “where I can say that without fear of retribution.”

On March 29, Mozilla’s Mitchell Baxter expressed the company’s official position on marriage: “As the Chairwoman, I want to speak clearly on behalf of both the Mozilla Corporation and the Mozilla Foundation: Mozilla supports equality for all, explicitly including LGBT equality and marriage equality.”

Baxter’s declaration did nothing to quiet the burgeoning anti-Eich mob.

Fueled by the relentless pace and unforgiving drumbeat of social media, gay software developers soon hopped aboard the bandwagon, threatening to stop writing code for Mozilla. Some 70,000 people signed a CREDO Mobile anti-Eich petition which, in turn, inspired Truth Revolt’s counter-petition.

On April Fool’s Day, a dating website called OkCupid asked its customers to spurn Firefox and patronize other Web browsers. As OkCupid’s online message said, “Those who seek to deny love and instead enforce misery, shame, and frustration are our enemies, and we wish them nothing but failure.”

Late that afternoon, cnet.com posted Stephen Shankland’s extensive, exclusive interview with Eich. Among many things, Eich said:

I still think it’s pretty important to judge people by how they treat others, in my case for over 16 years, and allow them to separate some of their deeply held beliefs which do not come into play in their role at an organization like Mozilla — even the CEO role. If we don’t do that, the principles of inclusiveness that we’ve practiced will be hurt. I know there are people who disagree on many things, but I’m fighting shoulder to shoulder whether you’re gay or straight, whether you’re married or single, whether you’re conservative or liberal, young or old, wherever you are in the world.

Eich also made an important point about his need, as CEO of a global company, to consider the views of Mozilla’s overseas customers and business associates:

We have a strong Indonesian community. We’re developing Firefox OS to go into market there. I have people there on the other side of this particular issue. They don’t bring it into Mozilla when they work in the Mozilla community. I met a lot of them at Mozcamp 2012 in Singapore. They don’t have quite the megaphone in that part of the world. But the Mozilla mission and our inclusiveness principles really must matter to include them too.

Not even alluding to old-school Muslim sexual mores could save Eich. Oddly enough, Eich swiftly was sliding beneath the bus thanks, in part, to his own technology. As cnet.com’s Shankland explained, “The Bay Area’s hyper-connected Internet-infused living can rapidly transform a controversy into a crisis.”

Eich would not survive the week.

“Brendan Eich has chosen to step down from his role as CEO,” Baxter announced on Thursday, citing him distantly — as if he were bound and gagged in her car trunk. “He’s made the decision for Mozilla and our community.”

“Mozilla believes both in equality and freedom of speech,” Mozilla’s executive chairwoman continued. “Equality is necessary for meaningful speech. And you need free speech to fight for equality. Figuring out how to stand for both at the same time can be hard.”

Hard, indeed.

Andrew Sullivan — an outspoken gay thinker, writer, and early advocate of gay marriage — is appalled.

“The whole episode disgusts me — as it should disgust anyone interested in a tolerant and diverse society, “Sullivan wrote. “If this is the gay rights movement today — hounding our opponents with a fanaticism more like the religious right than anyone else — then count me out. If we are about intimidating the free speech of others, we are no better than the anti-gay bullies who came before us.”

Sullivan described the anti-Eich crusade as “unbelievably stupid for the gay rights movement.” He added: “You want to squander the real gains we have made by argument and engagement by becoming just as intolerant of others’ views as the Christianists? You’ve just found a great way to do this. It’s a bad, self-inflicted blow.”

Now that Eich has been frog marched from his position for supporting traditional marriage in 2008, perhaps Obama should resign for his remarks on April 17, 2008.

“I believe that marriage is the union between a man and a woman,” Obama said at Pastor Rick Warren’s Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California. “Now, for me as a Christian — for me — for me as a Christian, it is also a sacred union. God’s in the mix.”

“Brendan Eich [was] forced to resign for supporting traditional marriage laws,” Instapundit.com’s Glenn Reynolds marveled, “for holding, in 2009, the view of gay marriage that Barack Obama held, instead of the view that Dick Cheney held.”

Bill Clinton imposed the anti-gay Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy, under which 7,239 gay members of the armed forces were stripped of their uniforms on his watch vs. 3,595 under the previous policy, as enforced during Daddy Bush’s tenure. Clinton also signed the anti-gay-marriage Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in 1996. Will gay activists now boycott Clinton’s events and oppose candidates whom he endorses?

DOMA passed the House 342-67, with 118 Democrats voting yes.

DOMA passed the Senate 85-14. The following were among the 31 Democrat senators who voted for DOMA on September 10 1996:

• Joseph Biden of Delaware
• Patrick Leahy of Vermont
• Barbara Mikulski of Maryland
• Patty Murray of Washington
• Harry Reid of Nevada

For her part, Hillary Clinton was amazingly out of step with today’s gay Left as recently as 2006. That year, she called marriage “not just a bond, but a sacred bond between a man and a woman.” In 2000, as the Daily Caller’s W. James Antle III recalls, Mrs. Clinton said, “Marriage has got historic, religious and moral content that goes back to the beginning of time and I think a marriage is as a marriage has always been, between a man and a woman.”

Will the anti-Eich crowd now picket these politicians’ offices, stop donating to their campaigns, and demand refunds for previous contributions? If, conversely, these Democrats were allowed to “evolve” on this issue, why was Eich not given that opportunity — especially given his inclusive statements and policies?

Those who whipped themselves into meringue over le affaire Eich should learn from Honey Maid Cereal’s TV commercial that answered anti-gay attitudes by taking a page (actually thousands of pages) from the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Nelson Mandela. A little less rage and a lot more love would serve these people, and America, well.

As a longtime and consistent supporter of gay marriage and equally tenured and committed opponent of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, however, I fear the coming backlash as straight Americans who have warmed to gay equality now will recoil at the gay Left’s neo-McCarthyism.

____________________________________________________________________________________

-Deroy Murdock is a Manhattan-based Fox News Contributor and a media fellow with the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University.

by @ 8:00 pm. Filed under Deroy Murdock, Opinion

Poll Watch: Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Survey

Rasmussen President Obama Job Approval Poll 

How would you rate the job Barack Obama has been doing as president?

  • Strongly approve 29%
  • Somewhat approve 20%
  • Somewhat disapprove 11%
  • Strongly disapprove 39%

President Obama Job Approval

  • Approve 49%
  • Disapprove 50%

Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. To reach those who have abandoned traditional landline telephones, Rasmussen Reports uses an online survey tool to interview randomly selected participants from a demographically diverse panel. The margin of sampling error for the full sample of 1,500 Likely Voters is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

by @ 7:30 pm. Filed under 2014, Barack Obama, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: PPP (D) Michigan 2016 Republican Primary Survey

PPP (D) Michigan 2016 GOP Primary Poll 

  • Rand Paul 16% [18%] (18%)
  • Chris Christie 15% [16%] (15%)
  • Mike Huckabee 15%
  • Ted Cruz 11% [15%] (7%)
  • Jeb Bush 9% [10%] (16%)
  • Paul Ryan 5% [7%] (12%)
  • Scott Walker 5% [5%]
  • Marco Rubio 4% [8%] (11%)
  • Bobby Jindal 3% [4%] (4%)
  • Someone else/Not sure 17% [14%] (10%)

Among Men

  • Rand Paul 17% [21%] (17%)
  • Chris Christie 15% [20%] (14%)
  • Ted Cruz 14% [14%] (7%)
  • Mike Huckabee 10%
  • Scott Walker 8% [6%]
  • Jeb Bush 8% [10%] (16%)
  • Paul Ryan 5% [7%] (14%)
  • Bobby Jindal 4% [4%] (3%)
  • Marco Rubio 2% [9%] (9%)
  • Someone else/Not sure 17% [7%] (12%)

Among Women

  • Mike Huckabee 21%
  • Chris Christie 14% [13%] (16%)
  • Rand Paul 14% [14%] (18%)
  • Jeb Bush 10% [10%] (17%)
  • Ted Cruz 8% [16%] (7%)
  • Paul Ryan 5% [7%] (10%)
  • Marco Rubio 5% [8%] (13%)
  • Scott Walker 2% [5%]
  • Bobby Jindal 2% [3%] (5%)
  • Someone else/Not sure 18% [22%] (9%)

Survey of 334 Republican primary voters was conducted April 3-6, 2014.  The margin of error is +/- 5.4 percentage points. Political ideology: 44% [39%] (40%) Somewhat conservative; 29% [33%] (29%) Very conservative; 20% [20%] (25%) Moderate; 5% [5%] (4%)Somewhat liberal; 2% [3%] (1%) Very liberal.  Results from the poll conducted December 5-8, 2013 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted May 30 – June 2, 2013 are in parentheses.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 5:55 pm. Filed under 2016, Poll Watch, Rand Paul

Poll Watch: Suffolk University Iowa 2016 Republican Caucus Survey

Suffolk University Iowa 2016 GOP Caucus Poll 

  • Mike Huckabee 11.02%
  • Jeb Bush 10.24%
  • Rand Paul 10.24%
  • Ted Cruz 9.45%
  • Ben Carson 8.66%
  • Chris Christie 7.09%
  • Paul Ryan 6.30%
  • Condoleezza Rice 5.51%
  • Marco Rubio 5.51%
  • Scott Walker 5.51%
  • Sarah Palin 5.51%
  • Rick Santorum 5.51%
  • Rick Perry 3.15%
  • Bobby Jindal 3.15%
  • Undecided 3.15%

Survey of 127 GOP caucus-goers was conducted April 3-8, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 8.7 percentage points.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 2:20 pm. Filed under 2016, Iowa Caucuses, Mike Huckabee, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Rasmussen Nebraska 2014 Senatorial Survey

  • Ben Sasse (R) 52%
  • David Domina (D) 27%
  • Some other candidate 5%
  • Undecided 16%
  • Shane Osborn (R) 48%
  • David Domina (D) 27%

Survey of 750 likely voters was conducted April 7-8, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 4 percentage points.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 11:30 am. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: Quinnipiac New Jersey Survey on Governor Chris Christie

Quinnipiac New Jersey Poll on Gov. Chris Christie

Do you approve or disapprove of the way Chris Christie is handling his job as Governor? 

  • Approve 49% {55%} [68%] (69%) {67%} [70%] (74%) {74%} [72%] (56%) {53%} [54%] (57%) {59%} [55%] (53%) {56%} [58%] (47%) {44%} [47%] (52%) {51%} [51%] (44%)
  • Disapprove 44% {38%} [26%] (27%) {24%} [23%] (22%) {21%} [21%] (38%) {42%} [39%] (38%) {36%} [38%] (39%) {38%} [38%] (46%) {47%} [46%] (40%) {38%} [36%] (43%)

Among Democrats

  • Approve 23% {36%} [51%] (41%) {46%} [48%] (56%) {56%} [52%] (28%) {22%} [27%] (30%) {30%} [27%] (25%) {28%} [29%] (17%) {17%} [17%] (27%) {22%} [24%] (18%)
  • Disapprove 68% {55%} [43%] (52%) {43%} [40%] (38%) {37%} [39%] (65%) {74%} [65%] (63%) {64%} [61%] (64%) {66%} [67%] (76%) {75%} [75%] (66%) {68%} [63%] (67%)

Among Republicans

  • Approve 82% {81%} [90%] (96%) {91%} [93%] (94%) {93%} [95%] (90%) {87%} [87%] (87%) {92%} [86%] (87%) {90%} [88%] (84%) {76%} [80%] (82%) {79%} [75%] (75%)
  • Disapprove 14% {16%} [6%] (3%) {5%} [6%] (5%) {4%} [4%] (7%) {11%} [10%] (11%) {6%} [11%] (9%) {8%} [11%] (12%) {15%} [16%] (11%) {12%} [13%] (14%)

Among Independents

  • Approve 54% {56%} [70%] (78%) {73%} [73%] (77%) {78%} [77%] (62%) {57%} [60%] (61%) {64%} [59%] (54%) {62%} [65%] (53%) {47%} [55%] (55%) {56%} [61%] (50%)
  • Disapprove 39% {37%} [24%] (18%) {19%} [21%] (19%) {18%} [16%] (32%) {35%} [34%] (32%) {32%} [36%] (37%) {31%} [30%] (39%) {44%} [36%] (36%) {32%} [29%] (40%)

Among Men

  • Approve 53% {54%} [67%] (71%) {72%} [75%] (82%) {79%} [75%] (62%) {62%} [60%] (61%) {67%} [62%] (60%) {60%} [65%] (58%) {53%} [56%] (58%) {58%} [63%] (53%)
  • Disapprove 43% {39%} [28%] (26%) {21%} [19%] (15%) {18%} [19%] (33%) {34%} [34%] (34%) {30%} [32%] (34%) {35%} [32%] (36%) {39%} [38%] (35%) {31%} [27%] (36%)

Among Women

  • Approve 46% {55%} [69%] (66%) {63%} [65%] (67%) {69%} [70%] (50%) {46%} [49%] (53%) {52%} [49%] (47%) {52%} [51%] (37%) {36%} [38%] (46%) {45%} [40%] (36%)
  • Disapprove 45% {37%} [25%] (27%) {27%} [26%] (28%) {24%} [23%] (42%) {49%} [43%] (41%) {42%} [44%] (43%) {42%} [44%] (55%) {54%} [53%] (44%) {45%} [44%] (50%)

Survey of 1,356 New Jersey voters was conducted April 2-7, 2014. The margin of error is +/- 2.7 percentage points.  Party ID: 36% {32%} [33%] (34%) {35%} [33%] (33%) {35%} [36%] (37%) {33%} Democrat; 23% {21%} [23%] (23%) {23%} [24%] (25%) {23%} [23%] (25%) {24%} Republican; 34% {39%} [35%] (37%) {37%} [37%] (36%) {36%} [35%] (34%) {37%} Independent; 7% {7%} [9%] (7%) {5%} [7%] (7%) {5%} [5%] (4%) {6%} Other/Don’t know.  Results from the poll conducted January 10-13, 2014 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted July 2-7, 2013 are in square brackets. Results from the poll conducted June 7-9, 2013 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted April 19-22, 2013 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted March 19-24, 2013 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted February 13-17, 2013 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted January 15-21, 2013 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted November 19-25, 2012 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted October 10-14, 2012 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted August 27 – September 2, 2012 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted July 9-15, 2012 are in square brackets. Results from the poll conducted May 9-14, 2012 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted April 3-9, 2012 are in curly brackets.Results from the poll conducted February 21-27, 2012 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted January 10-16, 2012 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted November 9-14, 2011 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted October 5-10, 2011 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted August 9-15, 2011 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted June 14-19, 2011 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted April 12-18, 2011 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted February 3-7, 2011 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted November 3-8, 2010 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted August 9-17, 2010 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted June 10-15, 2010 are in parentheses.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 10:05 am. Filed under 2016, Chris Christie, Poll Watch

Poll Watch: PPP (D) Florida 2014 Gubernatorial Survey

PPP (D) Florida 2014 Gubernatorial Poll

  • Charlie Crist (D) 49% {43%} [50%] (52%) {53%} [48%] (45%) {44%} [55%] (51%) {56%}
  • Rick Scott (R) 42% {41%} [38%] (40%) {39%} [43%] (42%) {41%} [32%] (38%) {34%}

Among Democrats

  • Charlie Crist (D) 77% {66%} [72%] (74%) {76%} [77%] (69%) {69%} [80%] (83%) {81%}
  • Rick Scott (R) 13% {20%} [17%] (19%) {15%} [13%] (15%) {16%} [9%] (9%) {7%}

Among Republicans

  • Rick Scott (R) 69% {80%} [65%] (65%) {66%} [81%] (77%) {69%} [61%] (72%) {68%}
  • Charlie Crist (D) 21% {14%} [21%] (29%) {29%} [12%] (15%) {19%} [25%] (16%) {24%}

Among Independents

  • Rick Scott (R) 56% {23%} [33%] (41%) {41%} [41%] (31%){43%} [32%] (33%) {30%}
  • Charlie Crist (D) 38% {47%} [57%] (47%) {48%} [47%] (52%){40%} [52%] (51%) {62%}

Among Men

  • Rick Scott (R) 52% {47%} [43%] (44%) {49%} [48%] (46%){43%} [37%] (39%) {41%}
  • Charlie Crist (D) 41% {39%} [46%] (50%) {44%} [45%] (42%){44%} [50%] (48%) {52%}
Among Women
    • Charlie Crist (D) 55% {47%} [54%] (53%) {61%} [50%] (47%) {44%} [59%] (54%) {60%}
    • Rick Scott (R) 33% {36%} [34%] (37%) {31%} [38%] (39%) {40%} [28%] (37%) {28%}

Survey of 814 Florida voters was conducted April 1-3, 2014.  Party ID: 44% {41%} [39%] (42%) {44%} [44%] (41%) {42%} (41%) {41%} [42%] (40%) {42%} [41%] (42%) Democrat; 39% {34%} [35%] (37%) {38%} [36%] (37%) {40%} (40%) {41%} [38%] (37%) {36%} [37%] (40%) Republican; 17% {24%} [25%] (22%) {18%} [20%] (21%) {19%} (19%) {18%} [20%] (23%) {21%} [22%] (18%) Independent/Other. Results from the poll conducted January 16-21, 2014 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted September 27-29, 2013 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted March 15-18, 2013 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted January 11-13, 2013 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted September 20-23, 2012 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted August 31 – September 2, 2012 are in parentheses. Results from the poll conducted July 26-29, 2012 are in curly brackets. Results from the poll conducted May 31 – June 3, 2012 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted April 12-15, 2012 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted November 28 – December 1, 2011 are in square brackets.  Results from the poll conducted September 22-25, 2011 are in parentheses.  Results from the poll conducted June 16-19, 2011 are in curly brackets.  Results from the poll conducted March 24-27, 2011 are in square brackets.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

by @ 4:00 am. Filed under 2014, Poll Watch

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